CRE Critical Developments Library

For decades, CRE has had three actions on its “wish” list:

(1) To write a history of OIRA’s centralized regulatory review, including that of its predecessors, and have it published in the Administrative Law Review

(2) To write a history of the concept of a regulatory budget emphasizing its foundations in welfare economics and having it published in the Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis.

(3) To be interviewed by the National Archives regarding the history of centralized regulatory review

The aforementioned actions were accomplished because of the foresight of Susan Dudley(#1), Michael Uhlmann and Tom Kniesner (#2) and the Richard Nixon Foundation (#3), they are as follows:

The Young Authors Forum

A number of existing and former CRE personnel are entering their fortieth year of consulting and are in the process of exiting to their initial places of employment. In doing so, they are encouraging their new constituencies, particularly those in academia, to take this opportunity to advance their interests in their particular vocation.

Consequently feel free to utilize this space to comment on a wide range of professional interests, including the CRE Public Policy Projects.

 

 

A Log on CRE’s Second Academia.edu Forum on Congressional Oversight of the Judiciary

Observers

The Birth of a Legal Doctrine in the Administrative State f

A Public Comment

Public Comments ff

A Log on the First Forum

Editor’s Note:  The Editor chose academia.edu as the mechanism for conducting this “symposium” on the Common Law Initiative because it is composed primarily of legal scholars outside the US.  The US legal academy while not in opposition to the Initiative most certainly has difficulty in supporting it since it places a potential governor on actions of  SCOTUS, the mainstay of administrative law curricula in the US.