Jan
15

A long shutdown hinders Trump’s deregulatory efforts

From: The Hill | Opinion

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Less visible, however, is the absence of smaller and less public-facing entities such as the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), which employs about 450 people. Nestled in the OMB is a small office, the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA), where I was part of the career staff until last year. An office that inspires colorful language, OIRA has been called “obscure but powerful” and the “cockpit of the regulatory state.” It has many functions, but the one that garners most public attention is its role in reviewing draft regulations before they are issued to the public.

Jan
08

2018: The Year in Regulation

From: American Action Forum

Dan Bosch, Dan Goldbeck

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PAPERWORK

This past year was a net deregulatory one in terms of estimated costs, but across all final rules, estimated paperwork burdens increased by nearly 10 million hours. The primary reason for this disparity comes down to a single rule: The Department of Agriculture’s “National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard.” As seen above, this rule clocks in at number one in the “Costliest Rules” ranking with roughly $5.6 billion in present value costs. The 20.5 million hours of new paperwork requirements under the rule likely contributed heavily to this price tag. This rule is something of an outlier for the year, however, as the second most burdensome rule brings only 900,855 hours – a difference of roughly 19.6 million hours.

Jan
03

OIRA Oversight of the Regulatory Process is an Essential Government Function

From: Bloomberg Government

Rulemaking Goes Dark During Shutdown Over Spending Standoff

Cheryl Bolen

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The agency rulemaking process continues for funded or excepted agencies, a senior administration official said in an email to Bloomberg Government. OIRA is providing necessary support to those agencies and activities, consistent with law, the official said.

Read Complete Article

Dec
26

Introduction of business rules slows sharply under Trump

From: Financial Times

Administration is also making progress in eliminating existing regulations

in Washington

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Government figures published by the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs show that while the Trump administration is making progress on eliminating existing rules, the biggest change has been in the pace of new regulatory actions.

In the first two years of Mr Trump’s term in office, 54 regulations classified as “economically significant” — with an impact of $100m a year or more — have been issued.

Read Complete Article

Dec
14

Here’s A Year-End Roundup Of White House And Federal Agency Efforts To Streamline Guidance Documents

From: Forbes

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Some revocations of rules or guidance can be quite obscure. In any event, there should be more attention given to reporting and inventorying guidance, best achieved in the current environment by a new executive order focused exclusively on guidance documents.

Interestingly, some of the highest-profile guidance that agencies have withdrawn or revoked did not appear on the agencies’ two-for-one tallies in either 2017 or 2018. In some cases, streamlining may amount to “rules about rules,” or guidance for guidance, whereby agencies rewrite or reinterpret former policy in a manner intended to reduce burdens. But here are some examples:

Dec
11

A $42 Billion Error

From: American Action Forum

Dec
06

Expanding the Scope of OIRA Review

Editor’s Note: OIRA review of independent agency regulations is a regulatory reform which has been publicly vetted for over fifteen years. See, Tozzi, Jim J. and Levinson, Bruce, A Blueprint for OMB Review of Independent Agency Regulations (March 1, 2002). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2740694 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2740694.

From: American Action Forum

Douglas Holtz-Eakin

Eakinomics: Expanding the Scope of OIRA Review

The Trump Administration is evidently considering the scope of the regulatory review provided by the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) within the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Specifically, OIRA Administrator Neomi Rao indicated the administration is considering expanding its review beyond the executive agencies (e.g., Treasury, Interior) to include independent agencies.

Nov
26

HHS/ONC rule still at OMB

From: Politico | Morning eHealth

By ARTHUR ALLEN

With help from Darius Tahir

WHITE HOUSE HOLDS ONC’S [Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology] INFO BLOCKING RULE: Some of us thought ONC’s annual conference later this week would be an occasion for the release of its proposal defining what kind of health care information blocking is acceptable. Doesn’t seem likely now, because Sunday night the rule was still at OMB’s Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. . . .

Read Complete Article

 

Nov
19

AEI Events Podcast: Assessing the administrative state with Neomi Rao

From: American Enterprise Institute

On this episode of the AEI Events Podcast, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) Administrator Neomi Rao visits AEI to discuss her office’s role in a centralized approach to deregulation and the administration’s regulatory reform agenda.

AEI’s John Yoo joins Administrator Rao in a conversation about how the president’s emphasis on deregulation has helped her office become more effective, and what the possible benefits may be of applying the centralized review process to independent agencies.

This event took place on June 19, 2018.  

Watch the full event here.

Nov
15

Regulating the Regulators

From: The National Review

By

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Rao is simply a fantastic choice for the DC Circuit spot. A former Clarence Thomas clerk and a brilliant legal scholar, she has the right mix of experience and training to be a superb judge (and at 45 years old, she could be a superb judge for a very long time). She also has the temperament every American should want in a senior federal judge—calm and thoughtful, but thoroughly independent-minded and unafraid of thorny controversies.

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