Archive for July, 2018

Updating the Federal Administrative Procedure Sourcebook

From: Administrative Conference of the United States

Submitted by Frank Massaro

This post is part of the ACUS Intern Blog SeriesThis article was authored by Victoria Barnard, a 2L at the George Washington University Law School. The views expressed below are those of the author and do not represent the views of ACUS or the Federal Government.

The first edition of ACUS’s Federal Administrative Procedure Sourcebook, published in 1985, filled gaps in the public’s understanding of the regulatory processes by which federal government agencies operate. It also served as an invaluable resource for agency officials, by centralizing publication of analysis, legislative history, related regulations, and other references for 18 procedural statutes, including the Administrative Procedure Act, the Freedom of Information Act, and the Paperwork Reduction Act.

Regulatory lobbying has increased under the Trump administration, but the groups doing the lobbying may surprise you

From: Brookings

Rachel Augustine Potter

While talk of whether Trump is or is not “draining the swamp” of lobbyists continues in Washington (and on Twitter), one form of lobbying—lobbying the White House about regulations—has quietly flown under the radar. The Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA)—the tiny White House office that serves as a clearinghouse for agency rules—regularly holds private meetings with stakeholders about regulations that are under development. These meetings are referred to by the anodyne-sounding term “12866 meetings” (in reference to Executive Order 12866, which governs regulatory review), but make no mistake about it—these meetings are regulatory lobbying pure and simple.