Mar
18

“NGO crackdown has foreign fund inflows plunging 40% since Modigovt era: Report”

The Economic Times posted the above-titled article, which reads in part as follows:

“MUMBAI: The Modi governments crackdown on foreign funding of non-profit organisaitons has resulted in a massive 40 percent decline in fund flows from external sources for social uplift in the four years to 2017-18, finds and industry report.

Over 13,000 non-government organisations have been acted against by the Union home ministry by cancelling their licences, according to a report by a foreign consultancy Bain & Co.

The report has also found that as many as 4,800 NGOs lost their licenses in 2017 alone.”

Mar
11

“Danish economist chosen as new UN environment chief”

The Guardian posted the above-titled article, which reads in part as follows:

“The UN secretary-general has picked the Danish economist and environmentalist Inger Andersen as its new environment chief, according to a letter seen by Agence France-Presse, turning the page on a scandal over expenses that rocked the UN agency.

Andersen, who heads the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) group of governments and civil society organisations, is set to succeed Erik Solheim of Norway, who resigned in November amid an outcry over his huge travel expenses.

The UN deputy secretary general, Amina Mohammed, told a meeting of ambassadors on Thursday that her boss, AntónioGuterres, had chosen Andersen.

Mar
04

“BRAC ranked top global NGO for 4th consecutive year”

The Daily Star posted the above-titled article, which reads in part as follows:

 “BRAC, a Bangladesh-based non-government organisation, has been ranked the top NGO in the world in 2019.

BRAC took the top spot for the fourth consecutive year of the ‘Top 500 NGOs World Rankings’ published by NGO Advisor, an independent media organisation based in Geneva, Switzerland.

BRAC retained the top position in a row due to its leadership role in Rohingya refugee crisis management, innovative new partnerships, and the continued scale of its reach, a press release issued by Brac said today.”

Click here to read the entire article.

Feb
25

“Consultations to review Egypt NGO law seriously considered”

On February 20, 2019, Ahramonline posted the above-titled article, which reads in part as follows:

”ZiadBahaaeddin, a former deputy prime minister and minister of international cooperation, says a huge effort has been exerted to listen to the recommendations of civil society since President Abdel-Fattah Al-Sisi ordered a review of the 2017 NGO law in November.

The consultations have been serious and comprehensive, he told a group of journalists at a seminar organised by the Egyptian Centre for Economic Studies (ECES).”

Click here to read the rest of this article.

 

 

Feb
18

“Fourteen NGOs oppose London Metal Exchange plans to ban tainted cobalt”

Forbes Sustainable Business websiteposted the above-titled article, which reads as follows:

“LONDON (Reuters) – Fourteen non-governmental organizations (NGOs) including Amnesty and Global Witness have opposed plans by the London Metal Exchange to ban cobalt tainted by human rights abuses, a letter seen by Reuters showed.

Cobalt is a key ingredient in the batteries that power electric vehicles, a fast-growing sector of the auto industry, and in metal alloys used to make jet engines.

It was singled out in LME proposals to embed responsible sourcing principles into metal brands deliverable against its contracts, which include copper and zinc.

Feb
11

“Mozambique NGOs call on Credit Suisse to write off debt”

News24 posted the above titled article, which reads in part as follows:

“Several non-governmental organisations in Mozambique on Saturday called on Credit Suisse to write off debt their government contracted with the Swiss bank as part of a massive ‘hidden debt’ scandal.”

Click here to read the rest of this article.

 

 

 

Feb
04

“6 insights for NGOs to transform corporate sustainability”

GreenBiz posted the above-titled article on its website. This article is by Bob Langert.  It reads in part as follows:

“Nonprofit organizations, or NGOs, have great opportunity to accelerate corporate sustainability efforts. Yet I see many mistakes. In my former career at McDonald’s, I was involved in the good, bad and ugly of NGO involvement. I recount much of this in my newly released book, “The Battle To Do Good: Inside McDonald’s Sustainability Journey.”

Companies get critiqued all the time on how they can do better and receive relentless feedback. Not so with NGOs. They too often get a free pass. Why would a company stir them up with criticism?

Jan
29

“Narcissism And Hubris Cause The Death Of An NGO”

Forbes published the above-titled article, which begins as follows:

“A Geneva-based NGO concerned with trade and sustainable development recently closed for good and laid off its 50 employees, largely because of its chief executive’s excessive salary and profligate spending of donor funds, according to a draft audit of the NGO’s operations.”

Click here to read the entire article.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jan
21

“Brazil environment chief accused of ‘war on NGOs’ as partnerships paused”

The Guardian posted the above-titled article, which reads in part as follows:

“Brazil’s new environment minister, Ricardo Salles, has suspended all partnerships and agreements with non-governmental organizations for 90 days, in a move that was described as ‘a war against NGOs’”.

Click here to read the entire article.

 

 

 

Jan
14

“Brazil’s president says NGO funding will be tightly controlled”

The above-titled article was posted on Reuters World News. It reads in part as follows:

“SAO PAULO (Reuters) – Nongovernmental organizations working in Brazil will have their public funding rigidly controlled, President Jair Bolsonaro said on Monday, as part of increased oversight of their activities by his new right-wing administration.”

Click here to read the rest of the article.

 

 

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